English Bull
 


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Manchester 20
Manchester 20 Judge
Crufts 20
Crufts 20J udge
National Terrier 20
National Terrier 20 Judge
WELKS 20
WELKS 20 Judge
Birmingham National 20
Birmingham National 20 Judge
SKC May 20
SKC May 20 Judge
Bath 20
Bath 20 Judge
Southern Counties 20
Southern Counties 20 Judge
Three Counties 20
Three Counties 20 Judge
Border Union 20
Border Union 20 Judge
Blackpool 20
Blackpool 20 Judge
Windsor 20
Windsor 20 Judge
East Of England 20
East Of England 20 Judge
Leeds 20
Leeds 20 Judge
Paignton 20
Paignton 20 Judge
Bournemouth 20
Bournemouth 20 Judge
Welsh Kennel Club 20
Welsh Kennel Club 20 Judge
SKC August 20
SKC August 20 Judge
City Of Birmingham 20
City Of Birmingham 20 Judge
Richmond Dog 20
Richmond Dog 20 Judge
Darlington 20
Darlington 20 Judge
Belfast 20
Belfast 20 Judge
Driffield 20
Driffield 20 Judge
South Wales 20
South Wales 20 Judge
Midland Counties 20
Midland Counties 20 Judge
LKA 20
LKA 20 Judge


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The English Bull Terrier

The Bull Terrier was developed in England during the 1860's and 1870's. During the 1860's and 1870's the Old English Bulldog had already been extinct for decades, and James Hinks of Birmingham employed the services of his own modern English bulldog named "Madman", the English White Terrier (which was not a working or sporting terrier, the White English Terrier began its creation in the 1860's, and was first presented to the public in 1864), along with some original Bull and Terrier dogs to develop and create the breed of dog we now know as the Bull Terrier.
Colored Bull Terrier's are due to Bull Terrier breeders crossing their dogs with Staffordshire Bull Terrier's in the 1900'S.
With the Original Bull and Terrier blood, combined with an injection of an original strain of Bull and Terrier blood from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier in the early 1900's, the Bull Terrier still remains a formidable sporting Terrier.
Bull Terriers are known as friendly and outgoing dogs, even having a "clownish" attitude about them, though they are usually not considered ideal for a first-time dog owner. Their physical strength is matched by their intelligence, and both body and mind need to be kept active. They can be fun and playful. As a breed they are generally placid and will not normally make the first move. They are very affectionate dogs that love human company. Bull Terriers are particularly good with children, and usually have a high pain threshold, which reduces the risk of injury from a defensive bite. Younger dogs, however, may regard children as playmates and because of their strength could cause inadvertent injury. They are protective of children in their charge. Bull Terriers do not make as good a guard dog as people think due to their fondness for people, but will defend his "pack" if needed.
Bull Terriers are thick-set and muscular with a short, dense coat. Acceptable colours for show dogs are white, (skin pigmentation and markings on the head are not penalised in the UK show ring), any colour other than white, or any colour with white markings (although blue and liver are highly undesirable).
The Bull Terrier's most recognizable feature is its head, described as 'egg shaped' when viewed from the front, almost flat at the top, with a Roman muzzle sloping evenly down to the end of the nose with no stop. The unique triangle-shaped eyes are small, dark, and closely set. The body is full and round, while the shoulders are robust and muscular and the tail is carried horizontally. It walks with a jaunty gait, and is popularly known as the 'gladiator of the canine race'.
There is no designated height or weight for the breed but the average is, Height: 51-61 cm (20-24 inches), Weight: 15-36 kg (35-60 pounds) The Bull Terrier is the only recognised breed that has triangle-shaped eyes.

 

Breed Clubs and Societies

 

English Bull Breed Standard