Scottish
 



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Archive Critiques And Results

Boston 21
Boston 21 Judge
Manchester 21
Manchester 21 Judge
Crufts 21
Crufts 21 Judge
National Terrier 21
National Terrier 21 Judge
WELKS 21
WELKS 21 Judge
Birmingham National 21
Birmingham National 21 Judge
SKC Sep/Oct 21
SKC May 21 Judge
Bath 21
Bath 21 Judge
Southern Counties 21
Southern Counties 21 Judge
Three Counties 21
Three Counties 21 Judge
Border Union 21
Border Union 21 Judge
Blackpool 21
Blackpool 21 Judge
Windsor 21
Windsor 21 Judge
East Of England 21
East Of England 21 Judge
Leeds 21
Leeds 21 Judge
Paignton 21
Paignton 21Judge
Bournemouth 21
Bournemouth 21 Judge
Welsh Kennel Club 21
Welsh Kennel Club 21 Judge
SKC October 21 (May)
SKC October 21 (May) Judge
City Of Birmingham 21
City Of Birmingham 21 Judge
Richmond Dog 21
Richmond Dog 21 Judge
Darlington 21
Darlington 21 Judge
Belfast 21
Belfast 21 Judge
Driffield 21
Driffield 21 Judge
South Wales 21
South Wales 21 Judge
Midland Counties 21
Midland Counties 21 Judge
LKA 21
LKA 21 Judge


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The Scottish Terrier

The Scottish Terrier originated in the highlands of Scotland and is believed to be Scotland's oldest breed of dog. In those far off days, hunters kept packs of small terriers to rid the land of vermin. Dogs were selected for their gameness and hunting ability. Appearance mattered little to the practical Scotsman. All he required was that his dogs be fearless enough to attack any prey; small enough to fight their way back out, and hardy enough to withstand a rough life and rigorous climate. These were the attributes deemed essential in the early hunting terriers and they are still the attributes we look for today.For hundreds of years they were Scotland's own terriers, but sometime in the late 1800's, enough foundation stock had been brought south of the border to warrant a breed name and distinct classes for them at English shows. The first Standard by which they were judged was drawn up in England in 1880, and the first breed club devoted to their interests was the Scottish Terrier Club of England, founded in 1883
All present day Scotties stem from a single bitch, Splinter 11, and two sires, Eng. Chs. Alister and Dundee. From these three are descended all the show champions on both sides of the Atlantic, first through the two great sires of the 1930's, Eng. Chs. Albourne Barty and Heather Necessity, and later through the famous '3Bs' of the '60's, Chs. Bardene Boy Blue, Bardene Bingo and Bardene Bobby Dazzler.
Scotties appeared on shores of America in the early 1890's but it was not until the years between World War I and World War II that the breed saw any significant popularity. By 1936, Scotties were the third most popular breed in the United States. Although they did not permanently stay in fashion, they continue to enjoy a steady popularity with a large segment of the dog-owning public.
The Scottish Terrier is a small, compact, short-legged, sturdily-built dog of good bone and substance. His head is long in proportion to his size. He has a hard, wiry, weather-resistant coat and a thick-set cobby body which is hung between short, heavy legs. These characteristics, joined with his very special keen, piercing, “varminty” expression, and his erect ears and fail are salient features of the breed. The Scottish Terrier's bold, confident, dignified aspect exemplifies power in a small package
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The Outlaw Of Falahill
FDR’s dog (Scottish Terrier named for Murray The Outlaw of Falahill) at the
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in DC.

During the 1944 election campaign, FDR was accused of leaving Fala on the Aleutian Islands and then spending millions of dollars to have a destroyer sent back to get him… You have to love that this little pooch could cause controversy.

Speech from FDR on Sept 23, 1944

“These Republican leaders have not been content with attacks on me, or my wife, or on my sons. No, not content with that, they now include my little dog, Fala. Well, of course, I don’t resent attacks, and my family doesn’t resent attacks, but Fala does resent them. You know, Fala is Scotch, and being a Scottie, as soon as he learned that the Republican fiction writers in Congress and out had concocted a story that I had left him behind on the Aleutian Islands and had sent a destroyer back to find him–at a cost to the taxpayers of two or three, or eight or twenty million dollars–his Scotch soul was furious. He has not been the same dog since. I am accustomed to hearing malicious falsehoods about myself–such as that old, worm-eaten chestnut that I have represented myself as indispensable. But I think I have a right to resent, to object to libelous statements about my dog.”


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Scottish Breed Standard